Thursday, April 7, 2016

Heroes and Villains: April 7, 2016

Focus: Who are the heroes and villains in F451?

1. Warming up with a few types of heroes...does Montag fit any of these categories?

2. Rereading Beatty's death (starting on page 117): Was it suicide? Are we supposed to feel empathy for him, or is he a villian?

3. Enjoying our penultimate fishbowl discussion: F451, pages 102-129


HW:
1. Please finish the book and your reading journals/annotations by next Tuesday.

2. If you're giving your presentation this Friday, April 8, now is the time to prepare.

3. ANY MAKEUP WORK/REVISIONS FROM THE LAST SIX WEEKS ARE DUE THIS FRIDAY. THIS INCLUDES MISSED FISHBOWLS. If you have any grades that need to be fixed, please e-mail me.

200 comments:

  1. I think that we could feel empathy for Beatty, even though he might be a villain. He was no different than everybody else, thinking that Montag was crazy, and it just happened to get him killed.

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  2. I did not feel any empathy for Beatty and thought that he deserved what he brought upon itself.

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    1. I agree with Sean. Beatty did not have much respect for anything, and he brought hatred amongst Montag and many people in his life.

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  3. I don't think we are supposed to feel empathy for Beatty because he wasn't scared of dying. I don't think he necessarily wanted to die, but if it came, he wouldn't try to run.

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  4. We should feel empathy for Beatty because he was just doing his job. Their society is this certain way, and we shouldn't judge them. Montag in their society was the 'villain' even though in our eyes he wasn't

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  5. I believe that Beatty was tricked, and that we should feel empathy for him. He always quoted books, yet he burned everything. When he died, he did almost nothing to fight back. He obviously made a mistake at some point.

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  6. I don't have any empathy for Beatty because I felt like he thought he was too clever and prideful that his Confidence lead to his death.

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  7. I think Beatty's death was not suicide at all. And I disagree with Erker because Beatty was just as crazy himself. I don't feel any empathy for Beatty because he put himself in that situation.

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  8. I do not feel bad for Beatty simply due to the fact that he was presented as a "bad guy" all book so I think the author did not want us to feel any emapthy for him.

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  9. Do you think with the lack of emotion there generation feels. Maybe Montag doesn't feel bad about killing Beatty

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  10. I did not feel empathy for Beatty and thought that he deserved what he got.

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  11. We shouldn't feel any empathy for Beatty because he is a villain and deserved what happened to him.

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  12. I dont feel bad for beatty I think that he was prepared for it because he knew the amount of hatred Montag had developed for him.

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  13. I think Beatty wanted to die because he put the flame thrower in Montag's hand and told him to pull the trigger. We don't need to feel empathy for him because he was the biggest road block for Montag and he wanted to die.

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    1. I think Beatty was bluffing and gambling that Montag didn't have the guts to actually kill him.

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  14. I do believe that it was suicide because even though it wasn't murder to yourself they way he acted he brought it on himself

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  15. "He twitched the safety catch on the flame thrower". This quote from page 119 is when Montag turns off the safety switch on the flamethrower and aims it right at Beatty. Do you think that this is a turning point for Montag in the book? Explain.

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  16. It's ironic that Beatty spent his entire life burning books which were looked to as a major flaw in society. Then Montag, a major flaw in society, burned Beatty alive.

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  17. I feel Beatty's death is not something to really feel empathy because of the harm Beatty has caused along with this terrible personality. With a character like this who did not had little to no hope in changing should not be given empathy.

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  18. I dont think we should feel empathy for him. All he did was burn books.

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  19. I didn't feel any empathy for Beatty during this as it was what he wanted. He didn't fight back and had just let it happen.

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  20. I don't think we should feel empathy for Beatty because she wanted to die in the first place and she wasn't scared of dying.

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  21. Beatty didn't deserve to die because he was just doing his job, however, he had very malicious intent towards Montag and went beyond just doing his job when it came to some of their interactions. I don't really feel very bad for him though, he just didn't necessarily deserve it.

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  22. I think Beatty's death was a murder because although maybe wanting to die, Montag still pulled the trigger on him and he was the one that killed him.

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  23. I don't feel empathy for Beatty because he brought this situation upon himself, definitely not suicide.

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  24. I think we should feel empathy for Beatty because him and all members of this society are victims of the decisions that they may or may not have agreed with that had been made for them. Beatty was just doing his job by burning things and it doesn't make him evil.

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  25. I think Beatty wanted to die because earlier in the book, there was evidence that he used to read books and now that he is opposing knowledge, he wanted to die and Montag helped him out.

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  26. I feel that we can make a connection to any of the superhero movies such as Batman, Superman, Captian America, Iron Man, etc. while watching the movie or reading the book, I feel that I don't have any empathy for the enemy when he/she dies.

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  27. I agree with what Erker said because of how Montag acted in the beginning of the book. Montag was very curios and confused about how he felt for different situations and subjects

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  28. I think that Beatty felt neutral about dying, and that's why he didn't put that much effort into putting out the flames, and be kept scolding Montag even while he was holding the flamethrower. You should feel at least a little empathy for Bwatty, since he did say that he sent the hound around Montags house one night to possibly scare him straight, and he even ignored the initial report on Montags house when he read Dover Beach to Mildred and her friends.

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  29. I do not feel empathy for Beatty because even though he read and quoted books like Montag he choose too punish Montag for doing the same thing.

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  30. I feel bad for Beatty because she was during what she think is right at the time during the book. I think the author wanted us to think Beatty was evil but I don't think she was.

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  31. I do believe that it was suicide because even though it wasn't murder to yourself they way he acted he brought it on himself

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    1. I agree with this because Beatty knew that he could've died but he still didn't take any caution.

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  32. Do you think Montag has any guilt for killing Beatty or has Montag always wanted to kill Beatty?

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    1. I don't think he does because Beatty has always been annoying and the one coworker that Montag cannot handle. Deep down he always has had the thought to kill him but he never went through with it.

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    2. I don't think he always wanted to kill Beatty but when Montag realized how Beatty saw him, Montag felt that he needed to act because of how crazy Beatty was.

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    3. I don't think he killed Beatty because Montag didn't like him. I think Beatty was just a road block in Montag's quest to change society.

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    4. I think Montag feels guilt. However, I think he feels relieved that he doesn't have to deal with him anymore.

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    5. I don't think he ever really wanted to kill Beatty because he never really liked him but he had no reason to kill him until he threatened Faber. And I don't think he has any guilt because Beatty wanted to die and Montag realized that after the act.

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    6. I think that Montag and Beatty had a great relationship, and seeing Beatty go was probably very hard for him, because Beatty was a key figure in his quest.

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    7. I think Montag's intention was to put an end to Beatty, "Beatty, he thought, you're not a problem anymore now. You always said, don't face a problem, burn it. Well now I've done both." (Montag - Pg. 121) I think Montag saw Beatty as a problem the whole time and that's why he had no problem with killing him.

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    8. I agree with Michael. He never really had intentions of killing Beatty even though Beatty wanted to get back at him for betrayal and the books. Until Beatty threatened to hurt on of Montag's closest friends, Montag had to do something.

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  33. I dont think we should feel empathy for him. All he did was burn books.

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  34. "Beatty wanted to die." I think this is a true statement. Not only did Beatty continue his rant on why Montag should be arrested but he also did not fight back against Montag. I feel like Beatty has more knowledge then he was letting on to. At the end, he was quoting shakespeare and so he knew that there was more to life but he was too dedicated to his job to let onto that. Therefore he brought about his own demise.

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  35. Beatty says, "Go ahead now, you second-hand litterateur, pull the trigger." I think that this proves that Beatty really did want to die. If he didn't why would he have given Montag the flame thrower in the first place?

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    1. I don't know if Beatty wanted to die but he was just crazy. He gave the flame thrower to Montag to test him. Beatty gave Montag the flame thrower because he probably didn't think Montag was going to kill him.

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    3. I agree with Korbin and Jacob both because although Beatty gave him the flamethrower he still probably had a really good idea of what was going to happen.

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    4. I just feel as though Beatty was underestimating Montag in which his stupidity let to his death.

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  36. "Beatty wanted to die'(Bradbury 122) Why do you think Bradbury put this quote into italics?

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    1. I think it was a thought not something that was said out loud.

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    2. Because it was a direct thought from Montag

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    3. I think Bradbury included this quote so that the reader is sure of Beattys intentions and that there was no other alternative.

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    4. I think Bradbury put this quote in italics because it needed to stand out and to show the readers that this is very important to Montag. Montag now has Hope in his life.

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  37. "There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats, for I am arm'd so strong in honesty that they pass me as an idle wind, which I respect not"(119). This quote seems to be from Shakespeare so it shows how Beatty has memorized a line from a banned book, could this have been the light of the situation before he died?

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  38. "He twitched the safety catch on the flame thrower." Why did Montag pull the trigger? Was it more that he was afraid of what would happen next or is it more he was just done with Beatty?

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    1. Beatty was getting in the way of Montag's goal

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    2. I agree with Graham, he already had a plan with Faber and wasn't going to give up because one person was standing in his way.

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  39. Do you believe that Montag feels sick for killing a human being or not.

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    1. I feel he definitely does feel sick even though it was hopefully for the better.

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    2. I believe that he has more things to worry about right now than what he just did, he is thinking more of how to escape then what did i just do.

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    3. I think he does feel sick and doesn't like the fact that he killed someone, but I agree with Alex he has a lot more things currently to worry about.

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  40. "He was a shrieking blaze, a jumping, sprawling gibbering mannikin" What do you think the significance of Beatty dying by fire was? Why do you think Ray Bradbury chose this death over other ways?

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    1. I think it was karma because all Beatty's life, he used fire as a way out of his problems and to destroy books. It all connects back to the mistakes he made in his life and he died because of those mistakes.

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    2. I think the death by fire allowed us to connect the fire aspect to the madness in this society. I also think the death by a flame thrower made a lot more drama and showed us how this change is causing a lot of anger and confusion because it's something new to everyone.

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  41. "Go ahead now, you second-hand litterateur, pull the trigger." He took one step toward Montag. Montag only said, "We never burned right..." "Hand it over, Guy," said Beatty with a fixed smile. And then he was a shreking blaze,"
    (Pg. 119). Why did Montag do this, did Beatty actually want to die or was he just bluffing because he didn't think Montag would actually do it?

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  42. I don't feel empathy for Beatty as he did nothing to fight back and almost let it happen. He underestimated Montag which led to his death.

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  43. On page 121 Montag is talking about his leg when he says, "A shotgun blast went off in his leg every time he put it down and he thought, you're a fool, a damn fool, an awful fool, an idiot, an awful idiot, a damn idiot, and a fool, a damn fool; look at the mess and where's the mop, look at the mess and what do you do?" In this paragraph Montag appears to be losing his mind. He keeps repeating things and calling himself names. Although the trauma he's had gave him some of this craziness, do you think that the books have confused his emotions enough to make him snap?

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    1. That's not the books talking. You read books. Are you crazy?

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  44. In some new version of the books and the Fahrenheit 451 play Beatty owns a massive library of books and says, "The crime is not owning books, the crime is reading them". Why would Beatty have the urge to own books as the Fire Chief?

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    1. Well he is clearly well taught and he can quote old books so I think that was part of the reason that he wanted to die. He wanted to die because he had all of these books and he felt ambivalent about the subject.

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  45. Is this a brother battle or a dragon battle for Montag?

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    1. I think it was a brother battle because Beatty offered to have a friendship with Montag in the begging

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    2. Brother battle because they used to be co-workers and friends before Montag started getting curious.

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  46. I think that when Montag says, "we never burned right" he means that although they burned books, books were not the part of society in need of burning.

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    1. I agree. I think that Montag meant that the society should burn their view on things like creativity and books.

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  47. Do you think the death of Beatty is the climax of this revolution? Meaning from now on, will this start getting easier and easier as books spread throughout society more and more?

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    1. I feel Beattys death gave Montag the courage and strength to fight on in this revolution.

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    2. Yes because Beatty was one of the biggest opposing forces against Montag and with him dead, it will be easier to spread the books out across society

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    3. Yes, because without Beatty more books will survive and more people will be able to learn about them causing the world to be way smarter.

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  48. With Beatty gone now. How do you think that will effect the future of the books?

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    1. I think that now that Beatty is gone, it will still be a challenge to get the future of books to expand because so many people are still looking for him. The task is defiantly not done but it'll be easier now that Beatty is dead.

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    2. I think that the future looks good for these books. Beatty ordered attacks and burned books himself, and without his leadership, I think more books can live in peace. <3 :)

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    3. I think that books will come back into their society because people want to know whats in books and what they mean.

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  49. At the end of this reading it describes montag swimming away from the hound that has never made a mistake. Is montag going to be his first mistake?

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    1. Can't you also think of Montag as their society's first mistake?

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    2. I agree with Owen. Montag can easily be seen as society's first mistake. Now that the order has been compromised there can only be room for even more mistakes which will eventually corrupt this society.

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  50. On pg 119 Beatty says"What'll it be this time? Why don't you belch Shakespeare at me, you fumbling snob? 'There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats, for I am arm'd so strong in honesty that they pass by me as an idle wind, which I respect not!' How's that?" Why do you think Beatty choose to quote Shakespeare in front of Montag was he trying to tell Montag something?

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  51. Why do you think that everyone in the world of Fahrenheit 451 thinks that, as Beatty puts it,
    “nothing will ever happen to me…there are no consequences and no responsibilities”? Is this
    similar to people in our society today?

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    1. I think everyone thinks that they can get away with anything and be fine. There are no consequences unless they don't get caught

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  52. I don't think we are supposed to feel empathy for him because he killed many people as well and was just a terrible person who didn't have empathy for anyone else.

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  53. Why do you think that Betty couldn't handle the pressure of reading books in secret and montag could?

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  54. I think we should feel some empathy for Beatty because he is trying to do his job. Yes what they do is wrong, but he needs to make a living somehow and maybe this is the only job he was able to get.

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  55. Why does beady quote Julius Cesar?

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    1. I think since Beatty was a great ruler like Julius Cesar Bradbury is showing a correlation between the two and they both share a great end of their rule.

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  56. Why did the author to choose to get him killed by fire? Did he want to enforce the theme or saying of, "What goes around, comes around"

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    1. I honestly think that Bradbury did enforce the theme of "what goes around, comes around" because Beatty was known to burn houses and even people with no regret. I find it payback for him to be killed by what he ended so many people and material belongings.

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  57. Do you think the author was trying to get something across with this murder? Is there a deeper meaning?

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  58. I don't think this is a suicide. He encouraged Montag because he didn't think he would be brave enough to actually do it. I don't think anyone would choose to die by means of burning.

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  59. I do not think that their needs to be any empathy for Beatty because it was basically Karma for what he had done. He sort of deserved it.

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  60. I think that Beatty wanted to die because he knew it was necessary in order for Montag to finally bring change to this society. Technically it was murder but Beatty came in with the intention of having Montag kill him.

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  61. I do believe it was suicide of some sorts because he brought the situation on himself.

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  62. I think this was a murder. Montag clearly killed Beatty. However, I think that Beatty was definitely made to be a villain. We feel that Montag is the protagonist, so the only person standing in his way, Beatty, is the villain.

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  63. I think Beatty is a villain. He was way too arrogant and underestimated what Montag was capable of.

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  64. We should feel empathetic for Beatty, although he was considered a villain he still was a human. On the other hand, we shouldn't feel sorry for what he represented dying. He represented that little piece of Montag that was telling him that he should forget about books and stay a fireman. Killing Beatty shows that he is letting go of that part of him and turning against the government completely.

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  65. I think that ray wants us to feel empathy because he doesnt send out posotive attitude that overwhelms the negative attitide he displays for the death

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  66. I also don't think we should feel any empathy for him because we know what he's doing is wrong. But in their society thats the norm and maybe they should feel a little because he is doing his job.

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  67. I think you should always think about the person and not just forget about him, but it is hard to feel a lot of empathy for a person like that. I also feel as if he out it on himself.

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  68. I think that beatty was kind of the color blue in this, she got what she deserved, not in a bad way, but I can tell that it was kind of karma. She wasn't a very pleasant person.

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  69. Montag in our eyes is the hero of the story, but in the world he lives in he is the villain because he is going up against the whole society. I think we should feel empathy for Beatty because he was only doing his job and in the eyes of the people he didn't deserve to die.

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  70. I think that Beatty was suicidal to some extent. I think he could have easily avoided being lit on fire by Montag but deep down he didn't really care about what would happened so he let Montag kill him.

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  71. We're definitely not meant to feel empathy for Beatty. He was an okay and pretty neutral character before, but especially in the scene of his death, he goes really crazy and shows his bad side. The author really had to make sure to describe him in an evil way so we would feel absolutely no empathy for his death.

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  72. "Beatty had wanted to die. He had just stood there, not really trying to save himself, just stood there, joking, needling, thought Montag..." (122). Beatty did nothing to stop his death, and although it wasn't him physically killing himself, he was demanding to be killed and was not going to stop the actions leading up to his death.

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  73. I think that Beatty wanted to die mainly because he was actually telling Montag to pull the trigger and he was slightly surprised by Montag aiming at him. I think he wasn't that surprised since he probably was only shocked that Montag actually aimed at him not that he was going to die.

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    1. I agree. Beatty though Montag was someone he could push around, when in reality, Montag is dangerous when it comes to what he believes in.

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    1. I think Assef was a little different from Beatty. Beatty was really only doing his job while Assef was committing horrible crimes.

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  75. If Beatty was just doing his job, should we really consider him a villain?

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    1. But they way that he treated people?? I don't know, maybe compare it to a relatable movie or something with a villain and a super hero

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    2. I don't think in his society, they necessarily consider him a villain. But because we know its wrong, yes everything he did was wrong and cruel.

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  76. Why do you think Clarrisse was such a big part of the book but the author only put her in the book for a short period of time?

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    1. I think her death was to really show how cruel their society is. Showing that they will kill an innocent teenager. Bradbury is showing the inhumanity within this book.

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  77. Do you think beatty getting killed by fire gives shows some symbolization

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  78. What do you think the quote "We never burned right..." means?

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    1. I can make a guess that it means that we never burned right, as in the society never burned right, it was never a normal society that is the first thing that pops into my head when i read that quote

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  79. To Montag death brought darkness down on his life, like the blacked out and abandoned house.

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    1. Yes death brought darkness, but do you think that society also brought that darkness to his life as well?

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  80. Do you think it is possible that Montag is considered the antagonist? Maybe we are supposed to feel empathy for Beatty because he was just doing his job. Also, we could be seeing Montag going insane for a lost cause.

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    1. I think Montag is the protagonist because the author chose the audience to read from his perspective and is happening around the world based on his observance.

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    2. I don't think we are supposed to feel empathy for Beatty because he has acted very arrogant and Montag is only trying to find a way to be happy and feel alive.

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    3. That is true, Dane, but what is good for himself might not be best for society. Maybe Montag is extremely selfish and wanted to live a life only he wants. Imagine if a drastic change happened in the world because of one person like banning cars. Just because one person wanted cars to be banned doesn't mean it is best for everyone. Everyone in the book seems to like life as it is and only few have a problem with it.

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  81. What part of the hero's journey has been Montags greatest challenge?

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    1. The crossing the threshold, since the leap from being apart of the society to being a rebel is pretty huge

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    2. I think that he has tried to find the cross between darkness and society and which part he belongs to

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  82. "Beatty had wanted to die. He had just stood there, not really trying to save himself, just stood there, joking, needling, thought Montag..." (122). Beatty did nothing to stop his death, and although it wasn't him physically killing himself, he was demanding to be killed and was not going to stop the actions leading up to his death.

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    1. Why do you think Beatty wanted to die?

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  83. On page 104 Faber says “I know. I know. You’re afraid of making mistakes. Don’t be. Mistakes can be profited by.” Do you agree with Faber?

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    1. Yes. I took this quote as him basically saying, you learn from mistakes. That's how you get smarter in your life. I believe his statement is accurate.

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  84. When Montag killed Beatty do you think Montag felt bad for doing it?

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    1. I'm not entirely sure but I feel like he feels bad that he killed someone but relieved almost that Beatty is gone forever.

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    2. In the spur of the moment, I believe Montag had no regret killing Beatty because he did say that if there is a problem, you burn it. That's exactly what Montag did.

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    3. I don't think Montag felt bad for killing Beatty. I think at the moment Montag just did what he thought he had to do.

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  85. When Montag kills the hound Bradbury writes, "Montag caught it with a bloom of fire, a single wondrous blossom that curled in petals of yellow and blue and orange..." Pg 120. Why do you think Bradbury uses something as beautiful as a flower to describe this act?

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  86. Beatty "Go ahead now, you second-hand litterateur, pull the trigger." Page 119. When he says this, it seems as if he wants to die. What are your thoughts on this?

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    1. I think that Beatty is tempting him with talk, but deep down he doesn't want it. Its like when we were kids saying to hit me when we really didn't want them to.

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    2. I think Beatty said this because he wanted to see how far Montag would go. However, I see it as a win win situation because if Montag didn't pull the trigger, Beatty would live. But if Montag did pull the trigger, it could end Beatty's life that he might've secretly hated because I feel that he had liked books before they were banned. It's just that one win would be greater than the other.

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  87. In society there is always hope in ideas as long as there is someone to care them on.

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  88. Was Montag's murder of Beatty justified?

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    1. In a way, yes, but also, no. I think it really depends on the perspective. In Montag's "spur of the moment" perspective, he said that Beatty told him to burn a problem when one arises. That's exactly what Montag had done. But, if you look at it from society's perspective, the murder was never justfied. Montag just went "insane" because he's one of the ones who decided to open a book and cause issues to arise.

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  89. How do you think the end of the book will happen?

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  90. "As you always said, don't face a problem, burn it." Beatty's catch phrase is encouraging the cowardice of the society. He probably thought that Montag was weak, and could be pushed around. Did Beatty suspect Montag as being courageous and going against everyone?

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  91. Do you think Montag really understands what he is doing?

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    1. I think that he doesn't know what he is trying to do but he likes the idea of books and what they bring

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  92. How do you think the book would change if Clarisse never died?

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    1. I don't think Montag would've gone to Faber in the first place and then the book would change in that way.

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    2. I think it would be very different because I don't think that Montag would have stepped up to become the "hero"

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  93. on page 104 Faber says "I know, I know. You're afraid of making mistakes. Don't be" How do you think this connects to real life? Do you think most people hold back from doing something great because they're afraid to mess up? How would the world change if nobody was afraid to do something because they might get judged for messing up?

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  94. "Burn them or they'll burn you"
    Do you think that this is almost an instinct to survive?

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  95. What is the importance of the Mechanical Hound in this chapter?

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    1. I think the hound represented society. I think that it is there to show the control that the government has and the fear people have for them

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  96. Does Montag has any guilt for killing Beatty or has he always wanted her dead?

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  97. In what ways will he regret killing Beatty?

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    1. I think you can go either way saying Montag will regret it or he won't, because Beatty wanted to be killed. But they did work for so long and who wouldn't feel regret killing someone?

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  98. Montag thought, "How strange, strange, to want to die so much that you let a man walk around armed and then instead of shutting up and staying alive, you go on yelling at people and making fun of them until you get them mad, and then..." (122). Would you blame Montag for the death of Beatty? Is Beatty's death his own fault, and does his desire to die put him or Montag at fault?

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    1. Yes, I do blame Montag for Beatty's death. However, he wasn't the only suspect in this action. I think Beatty wanted this and so he indirectly encouraged Montag to pull the trigger.

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  99. "Beatty had wanted to die. He had just stood there, not really trying to save himself, just stood there, joking, needling, thought Montag, and the thought was enough to stifle his sobbing and let him pause for air." Beatty earlier on in the book has left many clues about wanting to die now that we look back at it. Was Beatty egging Montag on? Why would he do this?

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  100. The government is the peoples family.

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  101. Do you think that the fact that Mildred left was a symbol of how big of an impact love has on society? Does love even exist?

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    1. I honestly never saw a sign of love from Mildred. The only true feeling of love that Montag expressed was towards Clarisse.

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    2. The only thing I saw Mildred love was the TV, so I feel that the book is trying to get that technology will wipe out love as it did with Mildred.

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  102. How will Montag feel and react when he realizes that he took someones life?

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    1. I think he will regret it for sometime and realize he went too far, but I also think that he will be glad he did it because Beatty was always looking over his shoulder, peeking in what he was doing with his life and where he was. So he got rid of him. One less problem to worry about.

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    2. Montag freaked out when he killed a woman who he did not know. Therefore, I think that it will hit him even harder when he realizes that he took the life of someone he knew.

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  103. What if Clarisse was introduced to the story after Beatty was murdered?

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    1. I don't know if he would have been murdered if Montag hadn't met Clarisse. Clarisse seemed to have sparked the new Montag and changed him.

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    2. I feel like if Clarisse wasn't introduced in the beginning, Montag would've never been in this situation in the first place. I think he has always been curious as to what would happen if he opened a book. Clarisse just came and opened it for him, exposing him to all these thoughts people fail to see.

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  104. Why do you think Bradbury never actually mentions the government?

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    1. I think it's because Bradbury wanted his readers to make their own opinions about the government in the book and have a sense of curiosity about the government

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    2. I think that he never mentions it because as readers, we can interpret the higher power in whatever way we want.

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  105. In the book, the beetle, as in the car, continues to be brought up. The Volkswagen Beetle is the most common car that would be referred to as a beetle. Is the author implying that the society is what would happen if the Germans were to have taken over?

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    1. Not a bad theory, there are some strong connections between F451 and Nazi Germany, the biggest being the idea of burning books to force people to think a certain way.

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    2. The idea of a controlling higher power is continuously being brought up. I completely agree with you.

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  106. Referring back to the first line of the first page in this book, "It was a pleasure to burn". Could this line relate to all of the action and drama happening in this section? Do you think that it was Montag's pleasure to burn Beatty and his belongings? How do you think Bradbury meant for this line to be interpreted?

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    1. I think this is really interesting. I think in this section Montag becomes a little bit crazy so I do think that could be in reference to this.

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  107. How can fire, the dog, and regret all tie in to how Montag feels and is going to feel for the rest of his life.

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  108. The name Beatty means "bringer of joy". If this is true, why do we see Beatty as such an arrogant man in this book?

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  109. Now that his wife and home are gone, will he continue to try to make a change in the society?

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  110. Are there a lot of characters that show empathy in F451?

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    1. I think empathy is very minimal in this society.

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  111. There has always been a pattern of suicide throughout this book. I have found that Beatty's death is ironic because he killed by the thing he uses to kill. Not people, but books. However, the books are given a life-like quality throughout the book.

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  112. "I know, I know. You're afraid of making mistakes. Don't be. Mistakes can be profited." Page 104
    I think Montag needed to here that. All through the book he has sprouted and has always worried of what people think of him and how he reacts. I think the thought of mistakes holds him back more than he thinks.

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  113. "They leapt into the air and clutched the brass pole as if it were the last vantage point above a tidal wave passing below, and then the brass pole, to their dismay, slid them down into darkness, into the blast and cough and suction of the gaseous dragon roaring to life!" Page 109
    I love this passage. It is weird to just add character to a moment that is happening unless it is important. I think it was played out this way because it signifies what has happened so far and what is going to happen.

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  114. "Why," said Montag slowly, "we've stopped in front of my house."
    What is Montag feeling, thinking? What does Faber think about what just happened? I think this was the turning point for Montag.

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  115. "I want you to do this job all by lonesome, Montag. Not with kerosene and a match, but piece work, with a flame thrower. Your house, your cleanup."
    That's kinda messed up to make somebody burn there own house down. Why does he do it? They already know he reads, why not just quit his job? Why not make this the step to change?

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  116. "Beatty flopped over and over and over, and at last twisted in on himself like a charred wax doll and lay silent." page 119
    Montag, I think, did the right thing. If no one is going to listen, if no one is going to make the change with you, if they are standing in your way, get rid of them. You need to shut those thoughts down and keep the creativity going. I mean he didn't have to kill him but he had to do something.

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